PL-3 Clinical Pathological Correlation (CPC)

Clinical Pathological Correlation: Goals and Objectives

The Clinical Pathological Correlation (CPC) is a requirement for graduation from the pediatrics residency program at the University of Chicago. Each resident will be expected to present a one-hour didactic CPC at some point during their final year of residency. Each resident should identify an interesting patient and base their CPC on that patient. Rare diagnoses or unusual or interesting presentations of more common problems are encouraged. Maintenance of patient confidentiality is an absolute requirement, so no identifying information should be presented. The speaker should identify a faculty expert with whom to discuss the case, preferably the attending that cared for the patient, and the faculty member should be encouraged to attend the CPC.

The beginning of the conference should focus on the patient’s history and physical examination. Photographs of examination findings, such as rashes or other visually-based physical findings, are permitted and encouraged as long as the patient has provided consent for the photograph and the patient cannot be identified by the photograph. The history and physical examination should lead to the discussion of a differential diagnosis.

Objective data should then follow. The CPC should include laboratory information, medical images, and/or pathological specimens. The speaker should discuss the rationale for the work-up performed. This should be followed by a correlation of the data with the differential diagnosis, namely an explanation of how the data helps further delineate the differential diagnosis.

The CPC should close with the identification of the patient’s diagnosis and an evidence-based discussion of the diagnosis in terms of the epidemiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic details of the disease process. Finally, the speaker will field questions from the attendees. If the faculty expert is able to attend, their comments will also be encouraged.

The CPC is a very important part of the academic program at the University of Chicago. Questions or comments on how to improve the experience are encouraged.

Please email the Chief Residents with any questions!